[VIDEO] Myths of Mankind: The Mahabharata [52 MINS]

“Maha in Sanskrit means big and bharata refers to the great emperor Bharat, whose empire was known as Bharata varsa, and covered the entire world approximately five thousand years ago.

The center of this empire was the region known today as India.

As such, all aspects of India’s millennial (Vedic) culture are compiled in this important epic of the history of mankind.

This episode explores the myth of the Mahabharata, laying out the very roots of Indian mythology, religion and history.

The world’s greatest and longest know epic poem with 100,000 verses exceeds the Bible and all of Shakespeare’s plays put together.

The myth tells of the founding of civilisation and a protracted battle between the two wings of a royal family: the Pandavas and the Kauravas, bitterly opposed in a struggle for life and death.”

Shocking that people keep asking me Emma Who? Emma GOLDMAN (1869 – 1940) was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the twentieth century.

“There are, however, some potentates I would kill by any and all means at my disposal. They are Ignorance, Superstition, and Bigotry — the most sinister and tyrannical rulers on earth.”
Emma Goldman, responding to audience questions during a speech in Detroit (1898); as recounted in Living My Life (1931), p. 207; quoted by Annie Laurie Gaylor in Women Without Superstition, p. 382

Perhaps one of my top five humans ever. She lived near Queen and Spadina, and her body was laid in state at the building which today is that big Dim Sum restaurant at St Andrews and Spadina, which was in 1940 a Labour Lyceum. Toronto has been cool (culturally/politically influential) for a pretty long time….

346 Spadina Avenue

Torontoist

Although she only lived in Toronto on three occasions over a 14-year period, and never for more than a year and a half at a time, Emma Goldman had an outsized cultural impact on the city. The well-known anarchist and feminist whom J. Edgar Hoover dubbed “the most dangerous woman in America” filled local lecture halls for talks on topics ranging from birth control and women’s rights to literature, communism, and anarchism. After her death in Toronto in 1940, she become a feature of the Toronto literary landscape, appearing as a character in John Miller’s A Sharp Intake of Breath (2006) and Steven Hayward’s The Secret Mitzah of Lucio Burke (2005). But she spent much her time in Toronto trying to leave it, desperate to return to the United States.

Born in Kovno, Russia (now Kaunas, Lithuania) in 1869, Goldman immigrated to upstate New York with her family in 1885. There she became interested in political activism, particularly in the aftermath of the Haymarket Bombing in Chicago in 1886. She moved to New York City and became a well-known orator and spokeswoman of the anarchist movement. By the age of 24, in the words of Sheldon Kirshner in the Canadian Jewish News (May 28, 2004), Goldman was “widely regarded by friends and enemies alike as a compelling professional agitator and public speaker.” A collection of her essays was published as Anarchism And Other Essays (1910).  Continue reading this article…

 

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Emma Goldman: Marriage and Love

[FILM] “It’s an essential parable of human gullibility. How much can people be talked into and how readily will they defer to an authority figure of sufficient craft and cunning? “Compliance” gives chilling answers.”

definitely reinforced my misanthropic nature. disturbing, to say the least. why do people not QUESTION shit? 
It takes courage to challenge the status quo—whatever and whenever that may be.

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About The Film

When a police officer tells you to do something, you do it. Right?

Inspired by true events, COMPLIANCE tells the chilling story of just how far one might go to obey a figure of authority. On a particularly busy day at a suburban Ohio fast food joint, high-strung manager Sandra (Ann Dowd (Garden State) receives a phone call from a police officer saying that an employee, a pretty young blonde named Becky (newcomer Dreama Walker) has stolen money from a customer. Convinced she’s only doing what’s right, Sandra commences the investigation, following step-by-step instructions from the officer at the other end of the line, no matter how invasive they become. As we watch, we ask ourselves two questions: “Why don’t they just say no?” and the more troubling, “Am I certain I wouldn’t do the same?”

The second feature from director Craig Zobel (the man behind the 2007 Sundance hit Great World of Sound), COMPLIANCE recounts this riveting nightmare in which the line between legality and reason is hauntingly blurred. The cast delivers startlingly authentic performances that make the appalling events unfolding onscreen all the more difficult to watch – but impossible to turn away from. Delving into the complex psychology of this real-life story, COMPLIANCE proves that sometimes truth really is stranger than fiction.

Why isn’t it easy to “just say no….”

–from http://www.magpictures.com/compliance/

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Ever Meek, Ever Malleable

August 25, 2012

By 

I INSTANTLY bought the strip-search. The nude jumping jacks, too.

But the spanking? Continue reading

[VIDEO] Boris Johnson’s “The Dream of Rome” – How the Roman Empire achieved political and cultural unity in Europe, and how it compares to the failure of the European Union

Boris Johnson tries to discover how the ancient Romans managed to run a united empire, and why the European Union seems to find the same task so difficult.

Boris Johnson looks at the issues facing European Union through the history of Roman imperial governance. It spawned a successful television series tie-in.‘MP, columnist, editor, television pundit and wit…his metaphors glitter; his similes soar…Johnson is never dull’

-Sunday Times

[VIDEO] “Your greatest enemy is your own inner perception, is your own ignorance, is your own ego….

….The ego is the worst confidence trickster we could ever figure.

“I am you”.

The problem is that the ego hides in the last place that you’d ever look within itself.
It disguises its thoughts as your thoughts, its feelings as your feelings.

“You think it’s you”.

Peoples’ need to protect their own egos knows no bounds.
They will lie, cheat, steal, kill, do whatever it takes to maintain what we call ego boundaries.
People have no clue that they’re imprisoned.
They don’t know that there is an ego, they don’t know the distinction.
At first, it’s difficult for the mind to accept that there’s something beyond itself, that there’s something of greater value and greater capacity for discerning truth than itself.

In religion, the ego manifests as the devil. And of course no one realizes how smart the ego is, because it created the devil so you could blame someone else.
In creating this imaginary external enemy, it usually made a real enemy for ourselves, and that becomes a real danger to the ego, but that’s also the ego’s creation.

There is no such thing as an external enemy no matter what the voice in your head is telling you.
All perception of an enemy is a projection of the ego as the enemy.
In that sense, you could say that 100 percent of our external enemies are of our creation.

“Your greatest enemy is your own inner perception, is your own ignorance, is your own ego”.”

—-“Revolver” directed by Guy Ritchie

[FILM] BLAME (2010) – ‘Hard Candy’-esque with different questions, a different journey and different results

Personally, I prefer walking into great films blind–without having seen trailers or read reviews…which obviously lends itself to disappointing fishing expeditions…although the discovery of gems is then that much sweeter. Below is the generic sense of a favourable review before the meaty bits..to which I’ll link to beneath. – rudhro

“This is a film best seen in the Cinema, and not like Avatar or Sucker Punch or some other rubbish. Blame should be seen in a Cinema because it deserves your full attention. The best Australian films don’t try to wow us with wild effects on a shoestring budget, or use every zany filter post-production can provide to dazzle away shonkily conceived images. The best ones are carefully plotted, painstakingly written, and always mindful of their potential limitations while simultaneously overcoming them.

Happily, Blame is one such film.” written by Elizabeth Lamb / AUSTRALIAN FILM REVIEW