[AUDIO] DAVID FRANCEY – ‘LUCKY MAN’: CANADA’S WOODIE GUTHRIE?


LUCKY MAN 

I saw you first in the smoky café light
When I came in from the frozen winter night
And I saw a face that put the stars to shame
I loved you ‘fore I ever knew your name
And my heart sank, lost without a trace
And it’s a lucky man that gets to kiss your face
I’ve seen you shine in the summer, spring and fall
But it’s winter when I love you best of all
And I’ve seen you in the spotlight hard and bright
And I’ve seen you in the shadows of the night
When I see you coming I can feel my cold 
heart race
And it’s a lucky man that gets to kiss your face
And I heard you singing to that empty hall
And I heard the joy that echoed off the walls
And I realized when all is said and done 
That youth is never wasted on the young
And I don’t believe the silence of this place
And it’s a lucky man that gets to kiss your face

Words and Music: ©David Francey

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From carpenter to songwriter – Since leaving construction and recording Torn Screen Door in 1999 Scottish-born Canadian, David Francey is recognized as one of today’s finest singer-songwriters. Francey has released 8 CDs to date. His most recent is “Seaway” – a collaberation with Mike Ford of Moxy Fruvous fame with songs based on their voyage on the M.V. Algoville. Francey’s CD, Right of Passage, earned him his third JUNO (Canada’s top music award) in less than 5 years. Francey also had the honour of receiving the prestigious SOCAN Folk Music Award.

“David’s straightforward songs tell honest stories of real people and real places. Poetic perception and a keen eye for the heart of the matter are trademarks of the man and his music. His songs and stories are a direct connection for audiences seeking depth and meaning in the day-to-day.” Shelter Valley Folk Festival

Touring with David is American ballad maker and multi-instrumentalist Craig Werth. www.davidfrancey.com , www.craigwerth.com

David Francey was born in 1954 in Ayrshire, Scotland, where as a paper boy he got his first taste of the working life. He learned to read at an early age, and by age eleven was devouring the newspapers he delivered. This helped establish his interest in politics and world events while developing the social conscience that forms the backdrop of his songs.

He was twelve when his family immigrated to Toronto. He says he can trace his love of the land, the history, and the people of his adopted country to weekend family drives exploring southern Ontario. Music played a large part in these family outings. They sang traditional Scottish tunes as they drove through the Canadian countryside. Dad and sister Muriel sang melody, while mother and David sang harmonies.

His attachment to Canada grew with travel. He hitched across the country three times, then thumbed his way to the Yukon. This attachment surfaces in his songs of rail lines, farms, and the St. Lawrence Seaway. He grew to understand the people while working in Toronto train yards, the Yukon bush, and as a carpenter in the Eastern Townships. These experiences colour his first CD, Torn Screen Door, with songs like Hard Steel Mill, Gypsy Boys, and Working Poor and his second, Far End of Summer, with Highway, Flowers of Saskatchewan and February Morning Drive.

In concert David is a singer and a storyteller. His wry humour and astute observations combined with his openhearted singing style have earned him a loyal following.

David lives with his wife, artist Beth Girdler and their three children Amy, Julia and Colin in the quiet but charming Lanark Highlands in southern Ontario.

-Francey website bio

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“David is one of the most talented performers to have appeared on our stage. He possesses all of what I consider to be the elements necessary to the success of a contemporary performing songwriter: a passion for the music he creates: great songwriting: beautiful arrangements: an amazing voice: an engaging and compelling stage presence and finally and perhaps most importantly, a warm, vivid sense of humour and fun.” Paul Symes, Black Sheep Inn, Quebec

“David Francey finds the poetry in our everyday lives and the soul in our forgotten places. And better yet, Francey cradles his down-to-earth stories in infectious melodies that make it impossible to resist singing along.” Maria Dunn, Edmonton, Alberta

“David Francey’s songs are lean, whippet-like creations, a bit like the man himself. With not one wasted word or superfluous line he takes the everyday, often mundane business of living and elevates it into something infinitely more noble and memorable, the mark of a truly gifted songwriter.” Eric Bogle, Australia

“Hands-down the best songwriter working in Canada today.” the Times Colonist, Victoria

“he’s the closest thing this country has to Woody Guthrie” the Georgia Strait, Vancouver

“Francey has made a reputation for himself as one of Canada’s most revered folk poets and singers… [His songs] are small and beautifully crafted pieces of work that have made Francey both a folk festival favourite and something of a latter-day Canadian poet laureate.” Greg Quill, the Toronto Star

“…one of Canada’s best loved troubadours” Greg Quill, Toronto Star

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